In The News

Posted August 04, 2016 by David Templeton on Sonoma Index-Tribune

“Transition Streets.” It sounds like some trendy Broadway musical, or perhaps a modern-day halfway house for folks moving from hardship to security. According to Ed Clay, cofounder of Transition Sonoma Valley, the colorfully urban-sounding title actually describes a citizen training program for small groups of neighbors, committed to making better decisions about energy-consumption and its effect...

Posted March 19, 2016 by Marie Goodwin on Personal Mycology

I've learned first hand about what activism burn out feels like. Last year I walked away from my long-time work in the Transition Movement, handing over the reigns to projects I started or created, and re-focused my energy on home and self-care. I don't think Transition work is all that very different than in other realms of activism, but burn-out seems to be the focus of a lot of discussions (...

Posted May 05, 2015 by Jeanette Origel & Sarah Byrnes on Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition

Community resilience is often thought of in concrete terms: growing local food, using sustainable energy, riding bikes and using alternative transit, and lowering carbon emissions. All of this is tremendously important. But resilience is also a question of who, as well as what. It is possible to imagine a future full of gated neighborhoods that are highly resilient, where wealthy people live in...

Posted May 04, 2015 by Megan Burks on KPBS

With mandatory water restrictions come water cops and drought shaming – what some call tattling on wasteful neighbors. But a group of mid-city residents has found a new strategy for coping with drought. They've formed a support group of sorts for neighbors interested in conservation. It's called Transition Streets and Jamie Edmonds is its lead. He's a retired firefighter who's always had penchant...

Posted December 03, 2014 by Joe Piasecki on The Argonaut

Seeds of a movement are growing in a fenced-off empty lot on the unflashy south end of Abbot Kinney Boulevard. Natalie Flores, 27, passed by the space a few doors down from Washington Boulevard — then a trash-strewn mess of dry grass and a handful of dying trees — during a meditative barefoot morning walk in February. “I’m looking at all these empty plots, passing them one by one. Eventually I...

Posted October 08, 2014 by Orion Kreigman on On the Commons

Egleston Square is a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood, straddling the borders of Roxbury and Jamaica Plain (JP) in the city of Boston. High condo prices and even higher rents are pushing long-term residents, to move elsewhere. This churning of the real estate market, to be expected in a profit-maximizing system, dissolves community and acerbates race and class divides. It is now common to hear of...

Posted October 01, 2014 by Original article by Jessica Stites, Commentary by Tenneson Woolf & Jeff Aitken on Reflections

  "At its core, the Transition Movement seeks to build the “social technologies” required to achieve long-term sustainability." ~Jessica Stites, “Is Your Town in Transition?”   In a commentary to Jessica Stites’ 2013 article “Is Your Town in Transition?” (originally published by In These Times) Jeff Aitken and Tenneson Woolf thoughtfully explore the role of Art of Hosting (AOH...

Posted September 30, 2014 by Interview with Maggie Fleming, Co-Director, Transition US on Northwest Earth Institute

This week we continue our series of interviews with NW Earth Institute changemakers: individuals who have tapped into their circles of influence, and are making a profound difference in the community. Today’s interview is Transition US’s Co-Director, Maggie Fleming. We asked Maggie how she stays inspired as a community organizer and environmental activist.What was your primary...

Posted September 27, 2014 by Diana Donlon on Huffington Post

Thanks to the epic success of the People's Climate March, alarm bells demanding climate action have never rung louder. So, now that you've succeeded in elevating the mother of all issues to the top of the global agenda, where should you and your fellow 399,999 marchers direct your tide-turning energies? 1. Dig in to Food and ClimateIf you're up to speed on the climate impacts of the energy and...

Posted July 31, 2014 by Mark Dwortzan on Cognoscenti

Whenever I buy grapes imported from Chile, fill my gas tank with fuel sourced in the Persian Gulf, or select underwear made in Thailand at a department store headquartered in Minneapolis, I can’t help but wonder how much longer we can all go on like this. That our survival hinges on the economic vitality of countless far-flung suppliers  of food, energy, clothing and other essentials gives me...

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