In The News

Posted October 20, 2010 by Fin Keegan on Smarter Cities, NRDC

On the national level, America looks unwilling to come to terms either with its addiction to oil or with the need to address global warming, but that pessimistic vision is far from the whole truth. Locally, towns are taking on sustainability issues whether through programs such as New York City's PlaNYC, signing on to the U.S. Mayor's Climate Protection Agreement or by tapping the know-...

Posted August 18, 2010 by on BioCycle

Transition Towns represent a network of communities across the globe actively planning for a future without oil. The movement was born out of an “Energy Descent Action Plan” developed by permaculture instructor Rob Hopkins and his students at the Kinsdale Further Education College in Kinsdale, Ireland. Permaculture is an approach to designing human settlements and agricultural...

Posted August 17, 2010 by Jay Tompt on Building Products.com

The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is a huge environmental calamity, but it should serve as a wake-up call for the LBM supply chain for another reason. Why?    The spill will certainly have an impact on local economies and local LBM dealers. But the spill is emblematic of much a bigger issue-the end of cheap oil. And that will shape the future of this industry, bringing tough...

Posted July 20, 2010 by Susan Andrew on Mountain Xpress

Ever ponder what life would be like without your car, a large grocery store with countless food items from around the globe, and dozens of box stores providing every gizmo you might need at any moment — much of it shipped from China? The group Transition Asheville does, and they have a plan. In this global age, climate change, global economic instability, overpopulation, declining...

Posted July 16, 2010 by Richard Halstead on Marin Independent Journal

 Andre Angelantoni of San Rafael sees a future in which global warming and dwindling oil supplies result in spiraling unemployment, food shortages and rising poverty; that's the bad news. The good news, said Angelantoni, is that there are steps people can take to prepare. "As mature adults, we can make plans rather than just get scared," he said. Angelantoni's company, Post Peak...

Posted June 22, 2010 by Interview by Willi Paul on PlanetShifter.com Magazine

  Transition Initiatives work with deliberation & good cheer to create a fulfilling & inspiring life. Co-founder & President Raven Gray: A joyful, positive, solutions-based approach for Transitions US. Interview by Willi Paul, PlanetShifter.com Magazine What are three key transitions that Transitions US has gone through since starting up here? Transition US was...

Posted June 05, 2010 by John Leland on New York Times

As oil continued to pour into the Gulf of Mexico on a recent Saturday, Jennifer Wilkerson spent three hours on the phone talking about life after petroleum. For Mrs. Wilkerson, 33, a moderate Democrat from Oakton, Va., who designs computer interfaces, the spill reinforced what she had been obsessing over for more than a year — that oil use was outstripping the world’s supply. She...

Posted April 20, 2010 by Lily Dayton on Monterey Herald

The idea of peak oil was first conceived in 1956 by U.S. geologist M. King Hubbert, who predicted that domestic oil production in the lower 48 states would peak between 1965 and 1970. Sure enough, oil production did reach an all-time high in 1970 and has declined since, said David Fridley, an oil industry veteran who now works with the Environmental Energy Technology Division at Lawrence Berkeley...

Posted March 24, 2010 by Lisa Wakeland on Cincinnati Community Press

They're daunting global problems but Transition Anderson is trying to tackle the issues on a local level. The new group - less than a year old - is part of a larger Transition movement with more than 40 national and international initiatives. "We're taking an integrated and inclusive approach to build resilience within our community to withstand the effects of climate change, a decrease in...

Posted January 12, 2010 by Tara Lohan on The Huffington Post

The coastal town of Lincoln City, Oregon, has a lot to lose if nothing is done about climate change. The town sits 11 feet above sea level, and unchecked climate change could erode its beaches or flood the town. Residents are taking matters into their own hands. "We could ignore it, let the federal government deal with it," Mayor Lori Hollingsworth says. "We're not willing to do that." Last year...

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