In The News

Posted August 05, 2011 by Erik Curren on Transition Voices

As stock markets around the world gyrate and froth at the mouth, the ranks are sure to grow of concerned citizens who aren’t waiting around for the government or the rich to fix things, but have instead taken matters into their own hands. Pessimists who foresee a quick and nasty collapse of society coming soon and have little faith in their neighbors are working to protect their families. This is...

Posted July 28, 2011 by MICHAEL TORTORELLO on New York Times

AS a way to save the world, digging a ditch next to a hillock of sheep dung would seem to be a modest start. Granted, the ditch was not just a ditch. It was meant to be a “swale,” an earthwork for slowing the flow of water down a slope on a hobby farm in western Wisconsin. And the trenchers, far from being day laborers, had paid $1,300 to $1,500 for the privilege of working their spades on a...

Posted July 23, 2011 by David Weintraub on Blue Ridge Now

Earlier this month, a groundbreaking forum was held in Hendersonville that looked at the issues likely to impact our community’s future. The forum, sponsored by Transition Hendersonville and ECO, the Environmental and Conservation Organization, featured Dr. Laura Lengnick, who discussed resource depletion, Nicole Foss a world-renowned economic analyst who talked about the credit crunch and its...

Posted July 21, 2011 by Jennifer Hill on Viilage Soup

  Notes from the Hungry Heron Farm, July 21, 2011 Yes, they’re young and robust, but that’s no excuse for their shocking behavior. I was young once and I never rode around the countryside on a bicycle, refusing to get into a car. They’re college students. I was a college student once, but I spent every extra minute working in the summertime to afford my vehicle, to pay for my apartment and...

Posted July 21, 2011 by Joan Huguenard on Sonoma Valley Sun

There’s excitement growing in this village. Amidst hard-to-contain apprehensions and yes, let’s use the word fears, about the future of the planet, here in Sonoma, within an ever-widening circle, an infectious optimism flowers. Profound changes of the global climate bring increasingly profound challenges; the depletion of easy-to-harvest oil, clearly spelled out in gas pump prices, profoundly...

Posted July 20, 2011 by Abigail Curtis on Bangor Daily News

  BELFAST, Maine — For years, Karen Ireland has been working to make the yard around her Cedar Street home more sustainable and environmentally friendly. On Wednesday morning, she got a lot of help to make that slow job happen much faster, as an army of friendly gardeners used shovels, pickaxes and other nongas-powered tools to do things like create garden plots, paths and a meditation...

Posted July 20, 2011 by Cindee Karns on Anchorage Press

The Transition Movement is a worldwide organization of small neighborhoods, which is forming as Transition Towns, to address some of the current problems we are facing in our country and world. It is not a political movement per se, but it suggests that we start depending on our own devices (without waiting for the government to help us) to meet the challenges that are coming. By pulling together...

Posted July 13, 2011 by Ruth Backstrom on The Durham News

Have you ever worried about where your food comes from? Ever wondered what caused that jump in food prices? Have you asked yourself, is it safe to eat?That is what many communities in this country (and around the world) are not only thinking, but doing something about! Come to a film series in Durham about local food that shows what people are doing all around the country and join us for a series...

Posted July 10, 2011 by Nancy Durham on CBC News

Two years ago, British teacher and permaculturist Rob Hopkins came up with a plan. He wanted to help communities prepare for the eventuality of a world without oil. That's how the concept of Transition Towns was born. The key to his initiative is sustainability at the local level — whether it's to do with food, transport, building materials or energy resources. Hopkins believes success in those...

Posted July 07, 2011 by Renate Valencia on Albany Patch

Would you like to see your plump, homegrown organic radishes blush crimson on a bed of sea salt in a sweet little restaurant? Interested in sharing your extra lemons with locally owned businesses? Community organizer and hyper-locavore Doug Reil is creating a new program that may be perfect for you. Albany Garden to Table, a fledgling Albany Edible Initiative, hopes to provide...

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