In The News

Posted July 07, 2011 by Renate Valencia on Albany Patch

Would you like to see your plump, homegrown organic radishes blush crimson on a bed of sea salt in a sweet little restaurant? Interested in sharing your extra lemons with locally owned businesses? Community organizer and hyper-locavore Doug Reil is creating a new program that may be perfect for you. Albany Garden to Table, a fledgling Albany Edible Initiative, hopes to provide...

Posted July 04, 2011 by Shankar Vedantam on National Public Radio (NPR)

Read transcript of interview >>  When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, one victim was political scientist Daniel Aldrich. He had just moved to New Orleans. Late one August night, there was a knock on the door. "It was a neighbor who knew that we had no idea of the realities of the Gulf Coast life," said Aldrich, who is now a political scientist at Purdue University in Indiana. He "...

Posted June 27, 2011 by Kathleen Dunn on Wisconsin Public Radio

Kathleen Dunn hosts on Wisconsin Public Radio's Ideas Network stations Monday through Thursday mornings from 9-11am, "leading balanced discussions about the issues of the day and the issues of our time." In this show, Kathleen talks with guest, Patricia Benson, Board Member of Transition U.S. to discuss "transition towns" in America, where community members engage their collective...

Posted June 20, 2011 by Sami Grover on TreeHugger

From efficient cook stoves in China to foot-powered irrigation pumps in India, the Ashden Awards have always had a focus on low-tech, affordable and accessible ways to cut carbon. One of the latest Ashden Award recipients is no exception—getting neighbors together over a cup of tea or a meal to brainstorm ways they can each cut their energy use and live more efficient lives. If the number of...

Posted June 15, 2011 by Haydn Shaughnessy on Forbes

What really drives changes in people’s lives? When I wrote about innovation policy challenges yesterday I noted how important towns and cities are in forging the new economy. Places are extraordinary compounds of activity and while some of the big ideas that emerge at conferences like TED arise in traditional academic/big company  culture, ideas about towns are more down and dirty...

Posted June 12, 2011 by Shelley A. Lewis on Huffington Post

The word "globalization" rings in most people's ears as a signal of our advancement, the recognition of our limitless ability to create and have -- beyond measure -- anything we want. A Delta advert on the subway reads, "A larger network makes a smaller world." So our world appears smaller, and not only does it fill us with a feeling of extended opportunity, but we assume that it is in our best...

Posted June 10, 2011 by Brian Davey on The Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability (feasta)

This was the theme of a massive congress held in Berlin last month. Brian Davey attended it and has written a report for Feasta in which he describes the role played by Attac and the Decroissance movement, Vandana Shiva’s critique of economic growth in India, the vision of “Buen Vivir” put forward by representatives of indigenous communities of Latin America and the new relationship being forged...

Posted June 03, 2011 by Maureen Morgan on Westfair Online

Note: This is the second part in a two-part series on the Genesis Farm, an organic farm that’s run on solar power in New Jersey. The writer recently attended a weekend-long conference at the farm, which has become a part of the international Transition movement.  The goal at the Genesis Farm “Deep Transition” weekend was to take the participants from where they started on Thursday evening...

Posted May 31, 2011 by Sami Grover on TreeHugger

As the massive impact of just one Transition group has shown, this community-led response to peak oil and climate change is having very real influence on how villages, towns and cities around the world operate—and it is often doing so by avoiding the traditional realm of political activism, instead focusing on grass-roots projects and inclusive, community-focused initiatives. But some in the...

Posted May 30, 2011 by Sami Grover on TreeHugger

It's always seemed strange to me that most parks grow only ornamental flowers and shrubs. Sure, it's nice to have pretty flowers around, but what if our parks also produced food for those who need it? From sharing gardens to community nut tree plantings, we have indeed seen some moves to turn shared land into a productive food producing resource. Now a group of Colorado residents...

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