Garden Exchange requires help from Mother Nature and faith in human nature

March 29, 2013

Garden Exchange requires help from Mother Nature and faith in human nature

Abigail Bleck

Publication: WNYT.com

ALBANY--On Friday, Tim Taylor prepared his back yard in Albany for a garden he likely won't plant.

"I know with work and balancing other duties I wouldn't have time to garden," the engineer admits.

But someone will.  Someone who doesn't have the space of their own to grow vegetables and fruit.

"We're like a dating service, for gardeners," jokes the Garden Exchange organizer, Sandy Steubing.

For the first time ever Transition Albany, a group that hails itself as helping to prepare the Capital Region for climate change, is organizing a Garden Exchange.  The concept is simple:  a landowner allows someone else to plant on their property.  It's modern-day share cropping...in Albany's South End.

"I think we are rediscovering what our grandparents and great grand parents knew all along," explains Steubing.

Both Taylor and his garden tenant will benefit.  They'll get locally grown, likely organic food, at a fraction of the cost. 

"It's nutritious, no food miles. I think it works all around," says Steubing.

And almost as important is the fact that the Garden Exchange also grows community and connections.

"I want to reach out to my neighborhood and meet new people," adds Taylor.

Read full article and watch related news coverage

Newsletter Signup

Donate